Leap Into The Past

“The Moving Picture Machine

A Piece Of Animation History”



About Us

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The team of MutoScope was formed in 2018 in the United Kingdom with the aim of bringing a fantastic invention back to life which has a few hundred years behind itself. In Europe our sister company, CityScope is already have Mutoscopes in Spain, Austria, Germany and Hungary. We want to make this machine – originating from the 18th century – available for more and more people throughout the whole country. It is not just a touristic highlight but an entertaining source of history. Our ultimate goal is to give another context to our world heritage and cultural values besides simple guided tours and guidebooks.

Besides simple pictures the machine provides the users detailed information about a defined area or building. In order to use this interactive tool you will need nothing just an arm. You only have to rotate the crank continuously to create a movie of approximately 2 minutes from the 1300 pictures placed on disk inside the machine. Aesthetic, unique, this little piece of history is a real reminiscence of its age. Besides strengthening the image of our country it provides an unmatched view.



History

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What Is Mutoscope?


The Mutoscope was an early motion picture device, invented by W.K.L. Dickson and Herman Casler. Like Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscope, it did not project on a screen and provided viewing to only one person at a time. Cheaper and simpler than the Kinetoscope, the system, quickly dominated the coin-in-the-slot peep-show business.

The Mutoscope worked on the same principle as the flip book. Rather than being bound into a booklet, the cards were attached to a circular core, rather like a huge Rolodex. A reel typically held about 850 cards, giving a viewing time of about a minute. The cards were generally lit electrically, but the reel was driven by means of a geared-down hand crank.

Mutoscopes were a popular feature of amusement arcades and pleasure piers in the UK until the introduction of decimal coinage in 1971. The coin mechanisms were difficult to convert, and many machines were subsequently destroyed.

King Kong Mutoscope Reel




Contact Us

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We'll be glad to answer your questions!

If you wish to contact us, you can either call us on 07909 221566 or alternatively just fill out the form below, and we will get back to you as soon as possible. We hate spam just as much as you do, so your email is safe with us!

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